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CXXXVIII.10. two mustachioed cowboys...

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 9:30 am
by allenitz
Bobbie Lamar was already
An older fella
When I was introduced to him

A native of Louisiana,
He had an endless pile of jokes,
Most told with a dead-on Cajun accent
Like Justin Wilson and Moms Mabley,
Though not quite as dirty
as either one, but just as funny

he broke up our quarterly managers’ meetings,
so funny, that the boss let him tell his jokes,
even though they added an extra
half day to every meeting

last time I saw him
he had gotten old as we all do,
giving up a little piece of our life
with every year that passes…

for Lamar, it was his memory
and though he had just as many jokes on file
as he ever did, he could seldom remember
the punch lines,
so he’d start a great joke and the rest of us
would be left to figure out how the old Lamar
would have finished it before being sidetracked
by his prostrate problems
or the latest in an endless series
of disappointment from the Dallas Cowboys…

but we didn’t mind, remembering him
in his prime, willing to imagine the old days
and his old ways of making us laugh
even if he couldn’t remember it all
himself
even though some of what he remembered
was worth remembering
even if we didn’t know how they ended

two mustachioed cowboys and a fat man in a clown suit
walk into a bar…

Re: CXXXVIII.10. two mustachioed cowboys...

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 10:44 am
by Bill_Back
I love funny jokes. Especially the clean ones as the times are what they are and I don't need people complaining if I tell a joke. Although I'll laugh at most of the other ones as well. I just won't tell most of them.

When my Mom got old, she forgot some of her stories. Good ones about growing up or teaching in one-room rural schoolhouses. When I would visit her, I would sometimes retell her stories and she would smile as she then recalled them. She would forget by my next visit and I could retell them.

My wife and kids complain my stories and jokes are old and I repeat them. But the next generation is coming up and she appreciates my stories.

bill

Re: CXXXVIII.10. two mustachioed cowboys...

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:51 am
by WayneS
Comes a time when our stories become oral history as we become relics of the past. The punchline to an old isn't important. Future generations will ask, what's a cowboy?

Wayne

Re: CXXXVIII.10. two mustachioed cowboys...

Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2017 1:22 pm
by hawkseye
but we didn’t mind, remembering him
in his prime, willing to imagine the old days
and his old ways of making us laugh
even if he couldn’t remember it all
himself
even though some of what he remembered
was worth remembering
even if we didn’t know how they ended


all good, Allen -- like how the poem sidles on down to this, where I picture a group getting together and everyone recognizing their own late-in-life losses -- forgiving because they each need to be accommodated for something too.

The final line roused a chuckle

Well done rendering of a scene I picture -- in a cafe or coffee shop --- bunch of old guys -- the chatter as guys chatter (so different from a group of women) and the stories (or half-stories) and the way each one of those guys is inside-grateful just to be there

-judy